fbpx

– Advertisement –

Tim Keller Praises NYT Article that Says the Absence of Church a Great Testimony to the Presence of God

by | Apr 15, 2020

We need your support. As big tech continues its crackdown on conservative blogs, our days on these platforms are numbered. Go Ad-Free plus get Exclusive Member-Only content by subscribing to us on Substack!

If you were still on the fence, holding on for dear life, and just needed one more reason to jump off the Tim Keller train, you’re in luck.

Tim Keller is bad for the Church. Really bad. Like bad news and bad influence. Besides the fact that Keller is one of the foremost propagators of the serious error that one can reject biblical creation and still be a Christian, Keller has influenced the Church toward social gospel heresies, Pagan mysticism, and contemplative prayer. (I’ve laid all this out in the article, What’s the Fascination With Tim Keller.)

As Big Tech continues to censor conservative publications like ours, we must increasingly rely on supporters to continue our work. Much of our work, particularly as it revolves around a biblical worldview on social and cultural issues, isn’t even allowed to be shared on social media anymore. This reduces our traffic and causes us to move more of our work exclusively to Substack. Members who subscribe to us on Substack will gain exclusive access to all of our work, free of ads and other annoying pop-ups, as well as member-only access to our podcast archive and controversial moderated content. Please consider supporting us today by subscribing at:



Tim Keller is now praising an article by leftist “woke” Evangelical and Wheaton College professor, Esau McCauley — who suggested the Bible is mistranslated because there weren’t enough black translators — who states in the article that the absence of Church is a great testimony to God’s presence.

In McCauley’s article, The Christian Response to the Coronavirus: Stay Home, published in the anti-Christ New York Times, McCauley writes,

The Gospel of John recounts Jesus’ words to his disciples in the upper room before his death. During this final discourse, he tells them that it is better that he goes away so that the comforter (the Holy Spirit) would come. The point is that the loss of his physical presence through his death, resurrection and ascension would lead to an even deeper communion with God. It is possible that, strangely enough, the absence of the church will be a great testimony to the presence of God in our care for our neighbors.

Of course, any Bible-believing Christian knows that this is diametrically opposed to what the Gospel of John actually means — the whole point is that the Holy Spirit’s work is seen by the world through the Church — her activities, her good works, her praise of her God, etc. This is astonishingly stupid and unbiblical.

Sadly, this is the kind of stuff that has come to be expected by those associated with The Gospel Coalition as for them, social justice has been elevated far and above the actual mission of the Church — the preaching of the gospel. Of course, it shouldn’t surprise anyone that Tim Keller would agree with this since, according to Him, the gospel isn’t spread by preaching it, but by “life examples” — and Christian art.

Comments

Join our active and vibrant discussion community on Substack. Click here to subscribe.

Latest

Abortion and Its Eternal Consequences

Abortion and Its Eternal Consequences

I have written before about abortion as a modern revival of Molech worship, and of its promotion by apostate clergy, but now I want to speak of its eternal consequences, both by the women who have an abortion and for those, clergy or...

Subscribe

Follow Us

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

You Might Also Like…

Abortion and Its Eternal Consequences

Abortion and Its Eternal Consequences

I have written before about abortion as a modern revival of Molech worship, and of its promotion by apostate clergy, but now I want to speak of its eternal consequences, both by the women who have an abortion and for those, clergy or...