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Beth Moore Turns Living Proof Prayer Hour Into Prosperity Gospel Hour

by | Oct 1, 2019 | Blog | 0 comments

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The prosperity gospel is arguably the second-most nefarious and subversive false gospel plaguing the American Church today, right behind the social justice gospel. The prosperity gospel teaches that God is, in a sense, a genie in a bottle and by having enough faith, you can get what you want from him — material gain.

The prosperity gospel in America is largely associated with celebrity hucksters like Kenneth Copeland, Joel Osteen, T.D. Jakes, and others, but the false gospel has plagued the more conservative sects as well. And while the prosperity gospel is stereotypically associated with health and wealth, the same principle applies to a multitude of selfish desires.

The prosperity gospel can range from praying for things like a new car, new house … a new private jet … to more seemingly appropriate things such as a spouse, the ability to have children, or a college degree. The principle doesn’t limit its application to the thing being desired, rather it is the motivation behind the desire that counts.

Further, the prosperity gospel isn’t limited only to seed-faith or seed-sowing which is typically associated with giving money to a preacher or ministry in exchange for promises of health and wealth. The prosperity gospel boils down selfish gain and is rooted in greed. More often than not, the prosperity gospel is simply praying for something that you want from a carnal standpoint as opposed to praying God’s will.

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Beth Moore, who is a hot mess of theological claptrap, endorses false teachers from all over the spectrum — from homosexuals to charismatics. But in the tweet below, Moore actually cites an example of her participation in the prosperity gospel. Apparently, a girl came in and asked for prayer for a Masters program — no mention of the gospel or Jesus. She shows up a few times during the two years, then comes back to flaunt her prosperity gospel trophy.

But it isn’t unlike Beth Moore to facilitate a false gospel, being that she’s embraced homosexuality, feminism, and social justice. Yet, for some reason, she’s still well-respected in Southern Baptist circles.

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