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TGC Promoting Hillary Clinton’s “It Takes A Village” Ideology

by | Apr 1, 2019 | Blog, News, Politics | 0 comments

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In 1996, Democrat First Lady Hillary Clinton published a book titled It Takes a Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us, which essentially attempts to demolish the conservative idea of the nuclear family — one father, one mother, and children — in favor of a communal system of raising children. The idea is anti-conservative, not to mention, un-Christian because it diminishes the rights of the parents to raise their children according to their own values and beliefs in exchange for the collective.

In recent years, the Evangelical Christian Church has been adopting anti-Christian and anti-Conservative ideology. Headed up by progressive outlets such as The Gospel Coalition and the Southern Baptist Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), liberal and Democrat politics have become normalized in the Christian Church. Everything from social justice and wealth redistribution to LGBT activism is now commonplace and widely accepted in certain Evangelical circles and making headway into historically conservative churches.

One particular notion that The Gospel Coalition and the ERLC have been pushing in recent months is the adoption of a new type of family, a “communal” family — discarding the notion of the nuclear family as idolatry. One such mouthpiece being used in this agenda is a gay Anglican priest, Sam Allberry. Last year, Allberry was invited to speak at the ERLC conference where he identified the “nuclear family” as a problem for homosexuals in churches and urged churches to move away from that idolatry and toward a more open, accepting church-family structure. Allberry even suggested that families be open to allowing homosexuals in their churches to babysit their children.

Then, Allberry put out a video at The Gospel Coalition urging churches to support single-parent adoptions because children don’t need both a mother and a father so long as they have their communal church family.

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In a recent article at The Gospel Coalition titled You Are Not Enough for Your Kids, Courtney Reissig writes,

Raising children isn’t meant to be an exclusively two-parent endeavor. It’s meant to be done in community. My forced separation taught me that I don’t have to be the center of my kids’ universe. During our time apart, I watched church family and blood family care for my kids with love. I saw that life went on even if I wasn’t there. I learned that my children will be well-adjusted, well-behaved, and loved even if I’m not the one doing most of the training all day every day.

The advocation that raising children requires a community effort is far more aligned with progressive Democrat politics of child-indoctrination than any biblical doctrine. In fact, the Bible does not teach anywhere the notion of a village raising children — it commands parents, particularly fathers, to bring their children up in the instruction of the Lord (Ephesians 6:4).

With the pro-homosexual push for inclusion in the Church, it comes as no surprise that the ones behind this movement desire to see the adoption of a broader communal family as opposed to the nuclear family. The nuclear family protects parental rights and enforces the value system instilled in children by their parents while the communal family concept would diminish parental authority and give progressives with their “collective thought” a broader control over the indoctrination of vulnerable children.

The Gospel Coalition demands that we honor homosexuals so long as they ostensibly remain “celibate,” and they want to essentially “adopt” the communal children in the Church as a means to satisfy a need for intimacy and family, which, according to Scripture, can only be found in a marriage between a man and a woman.

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