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Debunking Leftist Myths About Jesus: Jesus Was Married to Mary Magdalene

by | Jan 9, 2024

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In the ever-turning gears of leftist propaganda, a particularly raunchy and perverse narrative has been force-fed to the public—the claim that Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene. This assertion, plucked more from the realms of sensational fiction than any historical or scriptural reality, is played out like clockwork in various media and “scholarly” circles. It’s essentially a hack job on the gospel, a poison seeping into the foundational truths of Christianity.

The notion that Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene is not just a harmless historical hypothesis—it’s a calculated invasion of the sacred narrative of Jesus’ life and mission. This bogus theory, popularized by fiction and eagerly lapped up by leftist ideologues, seeks to undermine the very essence of Jesus’ divine purpose. The Gospels, our primary historical source for Jesus’ life, make no mention of such a marital relationship. To assert otherwise is to tread on the realm of fanciful speculation, far removed from the rigors of historical and biblical evidence.

From a biblical perspective, the Gospels present Jesus as singularly focused on His divine mission, an elusive figure in terms of worldly attachments, dedicated entirely to His eternal purpose. His relationship with Mary Magdalene, as depicted in the Bible, is that of a teacher and a disciple. This is a central theme that runs throughout the entire narrative like a spoiler alert for those who try to read between the lines where there is nothing to be found. Mary Magdalene, far from being a secret spouse, is portrayed as a devoted follower of Jesus. Her role was important, yet perfectly clear, observing and learning from the God-man, not partnering in matrimony.

She was present at the most pivotal moments of Jesus’ ministry, witnessing His crucifixion, burial, and crucially, she was one of the first to witness and proclaim His resurrection. These were not the marked moments of a clandestine bride but the spiritually charged experiences of a faithful disciple. To twist this relationship into a marital bond is not just a stretch, it’s a total perversion of the text, akin to peddling a bootleg version of the gospel.

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Mary’s encounters with Jesus after His resurrection, particularly in John 20:11-18, offer further clarity. Jesus’ post-resurrection interaction with her is not that of a hidden husband to a secret wife but that of a resurrected Savior to a faithful follower. It’s an invitation-only revelation, reserved for those whose hearts are open to the truth, who are called by God for His purposes, not for those seeking sensationalism in the sacred scriptures.

Historically, the claim of Jesus’ marriage to Mary Magdalene is as dry as the desert when it comes to credible evidence. It’s a narrative that first reared its bizarre head centuries after Jesus’ time, popping up in Gnostic writings. These texts are akin to a closet of curiosities, filled with symbolic and often contradictory content when stacked against the canonical Gospels. To give these writings the same historical credence as the biblical Gospels is like comparing a child’s fairy tale to a documented historical event.

The Gnostic texts, rather than being reliable historical sources, are more like esoteric scrolls, wrapped in layers of “well-respected” mystique. They delve into realms of supersecret knowledge and mystical interpretations, which are tantalizing for those who prefer conspiracy to clarity. But let’s be clear: their approach to historical accuracy is about as “scientifically proven” as a fortune teller’s crystal ball.

These writings, far from mainstream Christian thought, offer more of a speculative fantasy than a historical account. They are the kind of texts that, while perhaps intriguing, should be approached with a healthy dose of skepticism, especially when they make claims as brazen as Jesus being married. To base a serious historical argument on such shaky ground is to venture into the realm of fiction, far removed from the authoritative facts of the biblical historical record.

The danger of this myth is that it seeks to humanize Jesus to the point of stripping Him of His divine nature and mission. It reduces the Son of God to a mere character in a raunchy tale, a clown in the leftist agenda’s circus. This narrative does more than just misrepresent history; it attacks the very heart of Christian doctrine — the belief in Jesus as the sinless Savior, whose life and teachings were not bound by earthly institutions like marriage.

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