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Russell Moore’s Article Was Pure Trash, But He Was Right About One Thing

by | Jan 7, 2022 | News, Opinion, Racialism, Social Justice, Social Unrest, Social-Issues, The Church | 0 comments

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Russell Moore, former head of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, published an article on January 6 denouncing “white Evangelicalism”–because that’s his sole purpose for existence–and throwing Evangelicals who support(ed) Donald Trump in any capacity under the bus. In his article at Christianity Today, The Capitol Attack Signaled a Post-Christian Church, Not Merely a Post-Christian Culture, Moore, a far-left radical political operative who was installed in the Church as a change agent, completely conformed to the left’s “insurrection” narrative of what happened on January 6, 2021, at the U.S. Capitol.

More began his article by trying to tie “white Evangelicals” to a particular image that has been plastered all over the media–one, by the way, that all Christians should be repulsed by–of a symbolic gallows with a noose hanging from it that appears to have been an expression of the frustration with the government’s lack of serious attention to serious concerns about the election. He writes:

A year has passed since the January 6 insurrectionist attack on the United States Capitol, and two images still haunt my mind. One is that of a makeshift gallows constructed to threaten the murder of the vice president of the United States. And the other is that of a sign, held above that angry crowd, that read, “Jesus Saves.” That these two images can coexist in the same mob is a sign of crisis for American evangelicalism.

Notice that Moore, despite the growing evidence to the contrary, advances the left’s narrative that what happened on January 6 was an “insurrection.” Moore isn’t actually concerned with the truth; Moore, as we’ve documented for years, serves to advance the agenda of the left at any cost, including honesty. Moore pays no notice to the fact that these “insurrectionists”–every single one of them–were unarmed. Nor does he care that not only were the barricades and fencing around the Capitol, which were meant to protect the Capitol from insurrection, removed and opened by Capitol Police to allow the “insurrectionists” access to the grounds but doors were opened and unlocked by this same police who then waved them in and took selfies with these “insurrectionists.”

Nor does it seem that Moore is concerned with the fact that there is growing evidence that the riot was incited by federal operatives and despite the fact that Donald Trump attempted days prior to call in extra support from 20 thousand National Guard troops, these efforts were rejected by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi as well as D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser.

Yet, the narrative continues to be that Donald Trump–supported by his white Evangelical allies–participated in an insurrection against the Capitol; and that anyone who still supports Donald Trump to this day is a supporter of this insurrection who is only serving to destroy the witness of the Church and Christianity. Notice how he (not so) cleverly attempts to use the left’s narrative to make it impossible to support Trump and be a Christian.

Moore goes on to defend this point by noting that surveys are showing that a growing number of professing Evangelicals actually do believe that there is something to the claims of election fraud–which he outright dismisses as a “lie.” Once again, Moore, who professes to be a Christian and should be about transparency and truth, has no interest in investigating the actual credible claims of election fraud including the vast number of mail-in ballots that were counted despite various state laws against it. Would there have been enough difference to change the outcome of the election? We really don’t know. But isn’t it worth investigating and getting to the actual truth? Russell Moore just wants us to take the word of leftist, Trump-hating politicians at face value and run with it.

But all of that is beside the point; Moore’s attempt to conform to the left’s narrative that somehow “white evangelicals” are responsible for what happened on January 6 is repulsive. Moore’s attempt to connect mainstream Evangelicalism to the “noose” being plastered all over CNN and MSNBC is completely dishonest. Moore has no idea who was behind that makeshift gallows yet, he uses it as an attempt to discredit any Evangelical who supports Donald Trump.

Despite all of this, Moore is right about one thing in this article–there is a subset of Trump supporters who claim to be Christian and yet view their political activism as the end goal of their faith. He writes:

In some ways, what we have seen in the year since the insurrection represents a change. Note the increasing numbers of people who identify as “evangelical”—many of whom don’t even attend church—because they assume that this is the religious designation for their political movement.

There are certainly a growing number of people who don’t even attend church who claim to be Evangelicals and yet they view themselves, in a way, as apostles of the American faith. I actually agree with Russell Moore–despite my serious aversion to his agenda–that this is a disturbing trend.

However, my aversion to this is likely not for the same reasons. Moore’s aversion to these people appears to be grounded in his hatred of Christians who believe that there may actually be enemies on the left attempting to destroy Christianity. Moore does not believe the Church has any enemies, especially on the left. Moore does not believe that far-left radical Democrats stand in opposition to the beliefs and values of the Church. Moore does not believe that the left’s agenda is to destroy religious freedom and silence the Church pushing her underground.

That being said, our aversion to these “apostles” claim to Evangelicism shouldn’t be rooted in their political ideology–it should be rooted in the fact that most of them probably do not know the gospel–they certainly have not heard it from people like Moore–and that the Church has been weak in Evangelizing these people.

But Russell Moore does not seem to be interested in acknowledging that these people actually deal with real fears about the future, struggles and concerns about their wellbeing, and their desperate need for a savior. As Moore often likes to say about people–only when it’s politically expedient for him to do so, such as illegal immigrants and Black Lives Matter rioters–these people are made in the Image of God. I’ve yet to hear Moore refer to Trump supporters that way.

While Christians should always denounce actual violence as a means of getting their voice heard, the reality is that there was no violence at the January 6 event–save a police officer who murdered an unarmed White woman for no reason. There was no terrorism. There was no insurrection. Moore, as usual, is twisting the facts to conform to a narrative that supports his political agenda. Nothing more, nothing less.

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